The Simple Art of Lacto-Fermented Vegetables: Salsa

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Lacto-fermented vegetables were one of the first cultured foods I dabbled in. It seemed intimidating at first, that I could put some fresh vegetables in a jar, cover them with a brine (or just add salt), and once fermented they would keep for months.

It seemed too good to be true, frankly. But then we made delicious, crunchy, preserved pickles without a boiling water bath canner on a 90 degree day and I was sold.

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Lacto-fermented vegetables are the oldest version of preserved vegetables, right alongside dehydrated vegetables. They can be made so simply with just vegetables and salt, or you can jazz them up with various flavors and spices. The science involved in this process will preserve your vegetables, but the art of it is so simple that you’ll be making them over and over again.

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Shannon

Shannon is a mama to four small children, homesteader, freelance writer, and picture-taker. She lives with her husband on their off-grid homestead where they make and eat kefir, kombucha, sourdough, and fermented vegetables.

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My favorite fermentation tools

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Note from Shannon: I am pleased to bring the voices of our lovely contributors to this space every Tuesday. Please welcome Erin, CFH Customer Service Rep & cultured kitchen-keeper.

I like to keep things simple. Although I do love my kitchen gadgets, I don’t like them hanging out on my counter at all times. Okay… that may be  a lie… my husband doesn’t like them hanging out on the counter at all times.

Luckily, most fermentation is simple and pretty on the counter! With just a few key items, you can have a fermentation party on your counter top without having to have (too many) specific tools for each type of product.

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Erin Gaines

Erin Gaines

Erin Gaines is a Nutritional Therapist and a stay-at-home mom to two beautiful babies. My favorite cultured foods are milk kefir and sauerkraut. I feel these are the easiest and most versatile cultures. I have taught many classes on fermenting kefir, veggies, and kombucha. Before I was a mom, I owned my own company selling sauerkraut, kefir, and lacto-fermented condiments.

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Milk Kefir: The Common Mistake You Might Be Making

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Cultures are living organisms. As such, no two batches of anything are always alike. You might have success, at first, and then find that your culture is struggling. Milk kefir is no exception. While it is a fairly hardy culture, it has its needs just like all of the others – food, temperature, and attention.

If you’re following along with our series on making milk kefir (see part one for rehydrating the grains and part two for making kefir), then you might be getting into a rhythm of making milk kefir every day.You might desire to continue making lots of kefir and have your grains multiply in order to start new batches, pass them around to friends, or use them to ferment something else.

This is often where folks hit a wall, I know I have. There is a common mistake people make right about now that, if reversed, could help you keep your grains healthy, strong, and multiplying. Wanna’ know what the most common mistake is when it comes to keeping your grains healthy and strong?

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Shannon

Shannon is a mama to four small children, homesteader, freelance writer, and picture-taker. She lives with her husband on their off-grid homestead where they make and eat kefir, kombucha, sourdough, and fermented vegetables.

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Weekly Cultured Gathering: May 18th

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Welcome to the Weekly Cultured Gathering! We’re here to share and celebrate our adventures in food fermentation. From recipes to tips & tricks to food preservation – cultured foods are as old as food itself.

Maybe you eat cultured food because of the health benefits. Maybe you make it for the art and science involved. Maybe you believe that this age-old practice of souring dough, culturing dairy, brewing beverages, and fermenting vegetables is wonderfully sustainable. Maybe you feed them to your family because of all of the above.

Whatever draws you to the art of fermentation, this weekly gathering is a place where you can find others working towards the same goals as you are. It is a community.

So please share what’s culturing on your counter. Have a new recipe? What’s your favorite ferment right now? Why do you eat cultured foods? What have you learned that might help others?

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Shannon

Shannon is a mama to four small children, homesteader, freelance writer, and picture-taker. She lives with her husband on their off-grid homestead where they make and eat kefir, kombucha, sourdough, and fermented vegetables.

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