Long-Fermented Sourdough Tortillas

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In the world of sourdough there are two approaches. The first is for those who want to simply add sourdough flavor to something like a quick bread. The sourdough starter is added to a recipe which is then prepared soon afterward.

The second approach, one that I prefer, is a long fermentation. Much like the fermentation of the wild yeast-risen sourdough loaf, the long fermentation of quick breads, such as these tortillas, lend a fantastic tangy flavor. The main reason our family prefers this approach, though, is because the end product is always much easier on the tummy.

A lot of people talk about the neutralizing of anti-nutrients being the biggest advantage of fermenting dough. That may be true, but there is something about the pre-digestion of the grain done by the microorganisms in the fermentation process that really creates a much different food product for the digestive system.

Because of this, whole grain flours make softer, more tender baked goods.

Either way, it is our preferred means of making just about any flour-based baked good. And now that we’re firmly on the sourdough bandwagon, the awesome flavor and textures that result from the fermentation process are enjoyed by all, even in tortillas.

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Shannon

Shannon is a mama to four small children, homesteader, freelance writer, and picture-taker. She lives with her husband on their off-grid homestead where they make and eat kefir, kombucha, sourdough, and fermented vegetables.

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Ready-to-Pack-in-a-Lunch Individual Serving Size of Yogurt

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Want to impress your friends with slick looking jars of ready-to-eat yogurt in individual single-serving containers? Want to save time by having the fruit and sweetener already in the jar, layered and ready for the mixing when YOUR time is right? I have found a simple method to have yogurt ready for my family’s lunches, and at any point in the week all one has to do is grab a jar from the fridge and go!

There is actually another reason, besides convenience, for culturing in individual jars. As with any live culture, you expect variances in your end product since you do not have the controlled environment one has from a commercial retailer/producer. I was having issues with the “presentation” of my Matsoni yogurt.

In my personal experience, when culturing a mesophilic culture (it cultures at room-temperature without requiring a yogurt maker or electricity), I find that when I use raw milk especially, the yogurt looks perfectly smooth and thick when complete. However, when it comes time to scoop out what we want individually to plop into a bowl or cup, the yogurt becomes a bit runnier than what we are traditionally used to. Although it is absolutely delicious, it isn’t pleasing to the eye. I fixed this by skipping an extra “handling” step…I culture in individual jars so the yogurt looks pretty and untouched.

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Jerri

Jerri

Jerri is a wife and mama. Her culturing adventures began several years ago with other moms who were seeking a healthy way of feeding our families. Together they dabbled in milk kefir, yogurt, sourdough, kombucha and sauerkraut. In the past year she's expanded from sauerkraut to other vegetables, and has grown a passion for water kefir!

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Searching for the Perfect Pickle…

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Well, you know you are a cultured food nut when you think that a jar of fermented pickles is a healthy snack.

We love pickles in my house. My whole family has always loved pickles. But of all the different kinds of cultured foods I have attempted, this one is the most unpredictable and the hardest to figure out. One year I made two dozen jars of perfectly crunchy dill pickles… and they were gone by November. I have never been able to re-create them.

Last year I did five different batches of pickles, using various methods of pickling, fermenting, brining, etc., and various sets of ingredients. Some of them came out pretty well but not quite salty enough. Some bubbled over so much that the brine seeped out of the jars and I had to refill, and the resulting pickles were pretty much inedible. One set tasted delicious, but were so mushy we had to eat them with spoons.

This year I cautiously tried a new approach: natural salt-brine kosher dills from our own website. I had just two quarts worth of bumpy cucumbers from my garden ready to do something with, and this was perfect.

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Rosalyn

Rosalyn

Rosalyn has homeschooled both of her children, now grown, and continues to teach classes to homeschool groups and do homeschool consulting. She is also a nutritional coach, and enjoys helping people learn about healthy foods and how to prepare them. She is an avid cook and likes to experiment with new ways of putting together whole foods and cultured products. Kombucha is a favorite, in many flavors. Summer finds her kitchen full of fermenting vegetables, and year-round she makes yogurt, milk and water kefir, buttermilk, and sour cream.

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Ancestral Fermentation: Catching a Wild Sourdough Starter

Sourdough cultures have been credited with keeping the Pioneers alive as they traveled across country to start a new life in the West. They carried with them very little in supplies – accounts of flour sacks, molasses jars, and salt pork telling the tale.

I have always enjoyed reading of this time period, as I think it gives some great perspective. But you don’t have to go much further than the Little House on the Prairie series to hear how one or two meals of pancakes and salt pork a day made up a good part of the diet while traveling.

And those pancakes were often made with the sourdough starter the family carried with them. It makes sense to me. If you’re going to subsist mostly on flour products, then fermenting them first – both for nutrition and taste – makes a great deal of sense.

Back then, if a sourdough starter wasn’t given to you by a friend who had already established one, then you were going to have to make one yourself. It’s certainly not complicated, but it does take a bit of dedication, and it might surprise you a bit that we’re not just catching yeast from the surrounding air.

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Shannon

Shannon is a mama to four small children, homesteader, freelance writer, and picture-taker. She lives with her husband on their off-grid homestead where they make and eat kefir, kombucha, sourdough, and fermented vegetables.

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