Incubating Yogurt: The Hot Water Pot Method

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There are many ways to incubate yogurt. Many prefer the simplicity of an electric yogurt incubator which allows you to start it and forget it. Others enjoy the many do-it-yourself methods of making yogurt, even if they aren’t as sure of a thing.

Over the years I have made yogurt using many methods, but never have I ventured into using the electric incubators. This is for no particular reason other than perhaps a bit of an independent streak when it came to the need for electricity. Now that we’re off-grid, that choice is already made for me.

But here in Central Texas weather is wild and unpredictable and our young homestead is no match with an uninsulated kitchen. So when I came upon a simple yogurt-making method involving a pot on top of the stove I decided I might be able to use this method. A glut of goat milk all in one day sealed the deal.

And this was my first successful batch of thermophilic yogurt I’ve made since moving off-grid! Here’s how I did it.

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Shannon

Shannon is a mama to four small children, homesteader, freelance writer, and picture-taker. She lives with her husband on their off-grid homestead where they make and eat kefir, kombucha, sourdough, and fermented vegetables.

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How to Make Crème Fraîche

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Crème fraîche makes a delicious topping for soups, main dishes and even desserts. The decadent texture is rich, creamy, and very satisfying. Not only is making crème fraîche at home very easy, it allows you the option of choosing high-quality ingredients such as organic milk or cream if desired…. 

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Shannon

Shannon is a mama to four small children, homesteader, freelance writer, and picture-taker. She lives with her husband on their off-grid homestead where they make and eat kefir, kombucha, sourdough, and fermented vegetables.

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A Closer Look: New Zealand Rye Sourdough Starter

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The New Zealand starter has been excellent. I’ve cultured it with barley, rye, and wheat, and made numerous types of breads, pizzas, English muffins, pancakes, and even desserts (like gingerbread, cookies) with it. It has been very adaptable, tolerating a wide range of temperatures (after it was already live). I love how quick it is, as well.

The only thing I’d change in my last review is my review on price – it’s absolutely worth it. At the time, I didn’t appreciate the value of what I was buying, as it was my first starter, and I didn’t realize it could last a lifetime. Of course it’s worth the minimal initial investment! -Kim

Today we are going to take a closer look at the Cultures for Health New Zealand Rye Sourdough Starter.

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Shannon

Shannon is a mama to four small children, homesteader, freelance writer, and picture-taker. She lives with her husband on their off-grid homestead where they make and eat kefir, kombucha, sourdough, and fermented vegetables.

More Posts - Website