Sourdough Irish Soda Bread

irishsodabread

I’ve tried to get back to my cultural roots since becoming a mom, and found that using fermented and cultured food is a great way to show my children what our ancestors ate back in “the old country”. It’s rewarding to know that I can pass down a piece of my family’s history that my girls can one day teach their children.

When St. Patty’s Day rolled around, I realized the CFH site didn’t have an Irish Soda bread recipe. This was a problem that needed fixing! What’s an Irish girl to do (…well at least part Irish)!… 

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Stephanie

Stephanie

I've been a pastry chef and a cook for the majority of my adult life, so working for Cultures for Health is a natural fit! I’ve worked with fermenting personally and professionally. Some of my favorite cultured foods are sauerkraut, mead, mascarpone cheese, and pickled ramps. Since my step-daughter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in April 2014, I’ve strived to introduce healthy eating habits for my whole family. We do everything from gardening to teaching our children the joys of cooking and creativity. I’m a wife and mother of two wonderful daughters. I come from a large farming family and enjoy instilling old fashion values and fun in my children’s lives. In my spare time I enjoy baking extravagant cakes, cooking, painting, crocheting, knitting, gardening, and quilting. I believe it’s important to pass on passions and talents like these to the next generation, just as my mother and grandmothers did for me.

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Beneficial Indigenous Microorganisms (BIM)

garden

Someone recently passed on a garden tip somewhat related to fermentation… except this is for your garden.  It involves collecting different natural microorganisms from places where plants appear to be thriving.  Then you go through a process to grow more of them that sounds a lot like making a regular cultured food, but you don’t eat this!  Check it out…. 

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Shannon

Shannon is a mama to four small children, homesteader, freelance writer, and picture-taker. She lives with her husband on their off-grid homestead where they make and eat kefir, kombucha, sourdough, and fermented vegetables.

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No-Knead Method for Artisan Bread Baking: The Salt and Fold Method – Part 3 and 4

nokneadbreadSALTINGFOLDING

This is the last post in my series on the The Salt and Fold Method.  Here are the links to the entire series:

 Salting

Let the dough rest for half an hour in a warm place uncovered. By withholding the salt, you are giving your leaven or your starter a chance to inoculate your dough uninhibited. It’s like calling your teenage kids on a Friday night half an hour before you’ll be home – it gives them a chance to get their act together. This period is commonly referred to by bakers as the “autolyse period”. After half an hour, you are ready to add your salt. Do this by placing your salt in a small dish and adding just enough water to dissolve your salt into a thick solution. Dissolving the salt in water makes it easier to incorporate it evenly into your dough. Spread the salt evenly across the surface of the dough, wet your hands and scrunch dough together with both of your hands aggressively (like a cat sharpening its claws on the carpet). Keep scrunching until you feel the salt has been as incorporated as possible.

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Mason

Mason

Mason is a recent graduate of Augustana College and a die-hard foodie. He has a degree in philosophy, but also worked in a bakery using sourdough to produce bread with incredible flavor and texture. Apart from fermentation, he is fond of music, black coffee, nice wine, and thoughtful books.

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No-Knead Method for Artisan Bread Baking: The Salt and Fold Method – Part 2

nokneadbreadTESTING

Leaven Testing and Mixing

The best test for determining whether or not your leaven is ready to mix with is what is known as the “float” test. It’s pretty simple: take a fist full of leaven and place it in a bowl of water. If it floats, the leaven has enough aeration and bacterial activity to put levity into your bread. If your leaven sinks, put it back in the bowl and place in a warm spot for another hour or so. After 12 hours, your leaven will almost always be ready to go; however, during colder seasons it may take up to 15 hours. One way around this time difference is to build your leaven with slightly warmer (never hot!) water. This will speed along the fermentation.

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Mason

Mason

Mason is a recent graduate of Augustana College and a die-hard foodie. He has a degree in philosophy, but also worked in a bakery using sourdough to produce bread with incredible flavor and texture. Apart from fermentation, he is fond of music, black coffee, nice wine, and thoughtful books.

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