Soaked Flour Apple Cake with Caramel Sauce

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Desserts can get a bad rap in healthy-eating circles. But why not enjoy them from time to time using wholesome ingredients like traditional fats, unrefined sweeteners, and soaked or soured flours?

Soaking flour in an acidic medium is a method of making the grain more digestible, while lightening the baked good. The breaking down of the fibers in the whole grain flour often results in a much better tasting end product, akin to those made with refined white flour.

You can find more information on the benefits of soaking flours in cultured dairy in this article. And don’t forget to add something sweet, tasty, and nourishing, like this soaked apple cake, to your celebration table.

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Shannon

Shannon is a mama to three small children, homesteader, freelance writer, and picture-taker. She lives with her husband on their off-grid homestead where they make and eat kefir, kombucha, sourdough, and fermented vegetables.

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Buttermilk Ice Cream: One of Many Reasons to Culture Buttermilk

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Cultured buttermilk is often forgotten in the world of cultured dairy enthusiasts. But if you enjoy that unique buttermilk flavor for baked goods, salad dressings, and savory dishes; then keeping cultured buttermilk in your kitchen can enhance a whole host of dishes.

Buttermilk biscuits. Buttermilk fried chicken. Buttermilk pancakes. Buttermilk ranch. Buttermilk chocolate cake. All of these are some of tastiest foods we can put on the table.

One dish that might not be so familiar is buttermilk ice cream. The cultured tang lends a light, delicious flavor to the fresh cream and unrefined sugar that make up this recipe. Add in your favorite seasonal fruit during this high harvest time, and you’ll find just one more reason to keep that buttermilk culturing in your cabinet.

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Shannon

Shannon is a mama to three small children, homesteader, freelance writer, and picture-taker. She lives with her husband on their off-grid homestead where they make and eat kefir, kombucha, sourdough, and fermented vegetables.

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Homemade Salad Dressing Recipes

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People tell me that I’m a good cook. My husband talks about how flavorful my foods are, but things weren’t always that way. I used to be a pretty basic cook. I found recipes with five ingredients or less and made those, following the recipe to the letter.

A couple years ago a shift happened. It came from watching cooking shows, reading recipes (mostly on the internet), watching other people when I was at their home, and experimenting with different ingredients and spices. Experimenting was a huge leap for me. That was probably the thing that changed my cooking most.

I had mixed up oil and vinegar for a salad, but I had never made a dressing and certainly not on a daily basis. I thought it was too much work to mix it up every time we had a salad, so I didn’t bother. One day, while at a friends with my daughter for a playdate, she was preparing a salad. She pulled out a salad bowl and started mixing up a homemade salad dressing. I watched her like a hawk, memorizing everything she did.

I took that process home in my head and decided to alter it and make it my own. Here is my process.

  • A few tablespoons (eyeball it) of extra virgin olive oil
  • A tablespoon or two of vinegar – I change this up all the time, using red wine vinegar, white wine vinegar, balsamic vinegar or any vinegar I might have on hand and feel inspired to use.
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • Herbs & spices: I choose herbs/spices based on what I’m making for dinner, selecting ones that either match or compliment the herbs/spices I’m using in the main dish. Try parsley, basil, oregano, paprika, garlic powder, onion powder, cayenne, or anything that you think will work well. Get creative!
  • Then I add the secret ingredient . . . homemade, cultured sour cream. YUM. You can find the culture here. I drop in a dollop, probably about a teaspoon or two. This allows the oil and vinegar to combine and adds a wonderful flavor.

My husband raves about my dressing and thinks it’s about the best ever. He makes a pretty mean blue cheese dressing, too. And I think it’s about the best blue cheese dressing ever.  For this, you can use our Blue Cheese Starter Kit to make your own blue cheese. You will also need homemade cultured sour cream. Here is his process.

  • 1/2 pint cultured sour cream
  • 1/2 pint (homemade) mayo
  • Garlic powder and onion powder to taste
  • Salt to taste
  • 1-2 cups blue cheese, depending on your taste – mix in half, then fold in the other half
  • Let sit in fridge overnight to allow flavor to develop
  • Add water to thin if necessary

Enjoy!

Bonni

Bonni

Bonni started on the cultured foods path quite few years ago, beginning with sauerkraut. Since then, she has cultured yogurt, milk kefir, water kefir, kombucha, a variety of veggies, sour cream and gluten-free sourdough. She is a busy homeschool mom to her daughter, so is always looking for the most efficient and least time consuming ways to manage all of her culturing.

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SCOBYs, SCOBYs Everywhere!

 

I like Kombucha. No. I love Kombucha!! A lot! All summer long I was culturing my Kombucha in the cupboard above the refrigerator. Then winter arrived. With the colder weather and my insistence that we keep the thermostat down, our house is cold. Brrrr… The cupboard above the fridge will no longer do. I found the perfect solution. It turns out that in my oven with the light on just happens to be the perfect temperature for culturing. How cool is that? (Be sure to check your temperature before attempting this.) It’s a balmy 73º in there and as winter progresses I just might be tempted to crawl in there for a little vacation. ;)

Julie Feickert

Julie Feickert

Julie Feickert started Cultures for Health in late 2008. She is the mother to three young children and enjoys cooking and reading. Her favorite cultured foods include water kefir and kombucha. Julie lives with her family in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

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