Gluten-Free Sourdough Brownies: A Photo Tutorial

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Note from Shannon: Please welcome Jerri, Cultures for Health Customer Support Rep and Cultured-Kitchen Keeper.

I finally did it. Not only did I venture down the brown rice sourdough path, but I decided to make brownies too! Wouldn’t my kids love that? Absolutely!

It took a bit of time to get the hang of feeding my new pet, especially since a brown rice starter must be fed more often than a traditional gluten starter.

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Jerri

Jerri

Jerri is a wife and mama. Her culturing adventures began several years ago with other moms who were seeking a healthy way of feeding our families. Together they dabbled in milk kefir, yogurt, sourdough, kombucha and sauerkraut. In the past year she's expanded from sauerkraut to other vegetables, and has grown a passion for water kefir!

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Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free Sourdough Chocolate Cupcakes

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Baking itself can seem intimidating to some, but gluten-free baking can cause even more apprehension for those experienced in wheat-based baking. Things just aren’t quite the same. Thankfully there are some good tried and true recipes out there we can use.

I am about to embark on some gluten-free sourdough baking experiments and this recipe got me pretty excited. Not only is it gluten-free, but it is also dairy-free and involves a long fermentation period, which I’m a fan of. So I’ll definitely be trying this one out.

This recipe, and other gluten-free recipes, can be found on the CFH site. There you can find literally hundreds of recipes for all types of fermented foods. Just click on what you’re looking for – yogurt, kombucha, cultured vegetables, sourdough, and tons more.

Now about those cupcakes…

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Shannon

Shannon is a mama to three small children, homesteader, freelance writer, and picture-taker. She lives with her husband on their off-grid homestead where they make and eat kefir, kombucha, sourdough, and fermented vegetables.

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Exploring the Science of Sourdough

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Note from Shannon: Please welcome Janet Creasy, Cultures for Health Content Writer and Cultured-Kitchen Keeper.

One of the things your car needs to propel it forward is the element of fuel. In a similar manner, yeast is the driving force behind fermentation to make it rise.  Being the wide-eyed learner of science that I am, I find it quite amazing that one tiny cell can turn into millions over a short time if given the right surrounding elements. Not to mention the delicious bread it produces!

In researching this topic, I found this post, an Introduction to Sourdough, very helpful for me as well as my kids for it simply describes the science of sourdough:

This (sourdough) mixture takes on yeasts, acids, and bacteria when in the presence of a consistent food supply, air, and warmth. For optimum rise in baking, a higher amount of yeasts than bacteria in the starter is beneficial.

The article goes onto address the following:

  • How Sourdough Works
  • History of Sourdough
  • What Makes Sourdough Superior?

And if you’re interested in learning more on the science of sourdough, then take a look at these articles…

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Janet Creasy

Janet Creasy

Janet is primarily a proud mama of two tween girls and is married to a stellar man wired for engineering. She spends a great deal of time in the kitchen and garden. She enjoys the full life cycle of real food as primal fuel for our body; which she feels is critical to how we approach the world around us. She finds immense joy in seeing how many food culture ‘science’ projects she can keep going at one time! Her favorites are kombucha, yogurt and tempeh and she is delving currently into rice flour sourdough and water kefir.

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A Little Culture Goes A Long Way (recipe: Sourdough Baguette)

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Note from Shannon: Please welcome Rosalyn Newhouse, CFH Content Development Manager and Cultured-Kitchen Keeper, as she shares the culture found in her recent trip to France.

France has a reputation as the home of some of the best cuisine in the world, and on my first visit here, I am beginning to see why.

On a walk through Tournon, on the banks of the Rhone in southern France, we found no restaurants open on an early Sunday morning, but we were able to stop at a small convenience store to pick up some chevre, a couple of peaches, and a small sourdough baguette. We took these to a nearby shop serving wine (at 9:00am!) and coffee, and enjoyed a rich and flavorful petit dejeuner!

The sourdough had a crispy and flaky crust with a light and springy filling. The cheese was a slightly aged chevre. Creamy on the inside, it had a soft rind rind with a soft bloom and was a perfect partner to the baguette!

One of the things I noticed especially at the little grocery was that every single fresh food item – from the ripe, fragrant peaches, to the generous selection of cheeses, and even the fresh eggs! – was labeled with name of the town it came from.

In fact, a French friend we were talking with about recipes was disparaging about someplace he had eaten recently. “They don’t know where their ingredients come from!” It was the worst insult he could think of.

These are people who really connect with their food! Now, for that sourdough baguette recipe…

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Shannon

Shannon is a mama to three small children, homesteader, freelance writer, and picture-taker. She lives with her husband on their off-grid homestead where they make and eat kefir, kombucha, sourdough, and fermented vegetables.

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